A Quick Primer on Quick Response Barcodes

There are regular enterprise business systems, and then there are those exceptional systems that connect to sensors and allow integration with the real-world, simplifying logistics, lowering costs and saving money. We build such systems, and one of the areas our customers ask us about are barcodes. There is a new type of barcode that is sweeping the world, and you should know about how it may improve your business.

It is known as a Quick Response code or QR code. We’ve put together this QR Code Primer in Q&A form to answer the more common questions, and, should you have more, please feel free to contact us to have a no-obligation discussion.

 What are QR codes?

QR codes are bar codes similar to the UPC codes you see at the market but they are organized into rows and columns and therefore are able to contain more information. Customers use their smartphones to scan these codes to see more information – typically a web page – about whatever it is that these codes are associated with. QR Codes caught on big in Japan a couple of years ago and are now just beginning to appear in the United States. The codes can be used for other purposes too, say, within an enterprise to improve workflow (more on that below).

What do they look like?

While the can be any size, they are square and usually not more than an inch high.  Depending on how much data they contain, the dots (or pixels) will range from large to small.

Here are some sample QR codes:

QR code #1 QR code #2 QR code #3

The first code, on the left, is lower-resolution than the others because it contains the least amount of data. As more data is put into the same size QR code, the dots shrink to accommodate. Larger dots are generally better because the scanner is better able to distinguish them. The third code shows that there can be some creativity; some people even alter the dot pattern to show readable letters or images, but that comes at a cost of lower reliability.

How does a business use them?

There are a myriad of uses, even inventive new ones such as scavenger hunts, green ticketing, and furniture assembly. Common QR code uses are for the purposes of marketing, promotion, entertainment, education, information transfer, sales and retail, and workflow:

Marketing increase a business’ exposure and market
Promotion promote new products and special events
Entertainment e-ticketing, paintball targets
Education tests, lessons, report cards, museum guides
Information Transfer transferring business card information
referencing newspaper articles and online sources
Sales and Retail payments, track units sold, units returned
Workflow sequencing, provisioning, inventory control

sample promotional use

Are there alternatives?

Yes, there are the QR code’s ancestors of single row of parallel lines like the ubiquitous UPC code, and there are other matrix bar code formats including specialty ones used in manufacturing to work across longer distances between objects with the code and the scanner. There are new codes being invented all the time such as Microsoft tags, but unless there is a compelling overriding reason, typically we recommend sticking with one of the more common and better supported formats.

What apps are already available?

General-purpose scanner apps for mobile devices are everywhere. Just go to your favorite app store and search for “qr code.” The real challenge is for a business to set up an appropriate system and then generate the codes to be useful in some way. Sometimes based on the nature of the business use a custom scanner apps needs to be developed.

How can my business make use of QR codes?

If you are asking this question, then you already have some idea of how QR codes may be able to streamline your operation or be used to promote some product, service or event.  Some uses are straightforward and require not much more that creating a landing webpage, generating a code with its URL, and printing the code on promotional materials.

cute QR coded presentAs system developers, we are also interested in the area where QR codes hold tremendous promise but not much has yet been done … with business enterprise. These more sophisticated uses require finely tuned apps particularly when the codes are used to track workflow through various states and statuses. For a large operation, the scanning of codes feeds a company-wide enterprise system to keep important databases up-to-date automatically. As one quick example, Starbucks recently announced that it is now accepting QR code-based mobile device payments at 7,500 locations.

Depending on the application, there can be some “gotchas,” even with seemingly benign uses, for example the problem we identified with Apple mobile devices.

cute QR coded presentOur experience with barcodes and scanning goes back a few years when some of our team members designed printers and scanning equipment. As a result of our rapid development ability, our customers have been very happy with our systems including the good folks behind the NBC game show “1 vs 100.” Let us know how we might assist you.

3 Responses to A Quick Primer on Quick Response Barcodes

  1. Pingback: Business Card QR Codes and the Apple vCard Problem

  2. Pingback: Death To The QR Code? | DataPlex.com/blog/

  3. Pingback: Quick Primer on QR (Quick Response) Codes | Talk Sense Pte. Ltd.

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