Tag Archives: AmpUp

Death To The QR Code?

Recently, a business journalist posted an article suggesting that the use of QR codes should be dropped. He says in part “Mobile barcodes can be confusing and can waste time. And as mobile technology progresses, they probably aren’t even necessary.”

We disagree.

DataPlex QR CodeThis is one of those “insights” where the author doesn’t make his case. On one hand he presumes that technology will remain static and that the barriers to QR Code scanning — locating the right scanning app, waiting for the camera to focus, etc. — won’t improve and therefore users will be turned off. On the other hand, “near field communications” may arise in the next generation of smartphones to render QR code scanning obsolete. Which is it, is technology static or evolving?

We think that QR codes are a perfect ‘tweener technology that has virtually no extra printing cost and works with all smartphones. Yes, you have to be sure to use a compatible application, but once you figure that out for QR Codes (and again for Microsoft Tag codes), you’re set. Launching the app, waiting for the camera to focus and having the app autodetect the QR code and link to the corresponding URL takes no more than a few seconds. That is much faster than typing in a URL or keywords, if you don’t make mistakes or get distracted before you finish.

Also, when coupled with the right type of business software such as that based on our web-based, Rapid Enterprise Deployment engine known as AmpUp, the added cost of putting together a QR-code marketing campaign is negligible, so therefore the resulting ROI can be huge. Such systems can produce all of the differing QR codes, maintain a database, and then provide URL landing pages with corresponding and compelling content. Through web dashboards, company execs continuously monitor a campaign’s performance and even tweak it midstream if necessary.

The author suggests also that image recognition is a reasonable alternative. Not so. Mobile devices do not have the processing horsepower to implement broad-range image recognition, so they would have to upload the captured image to a capable server and receive the results. This might work for low-frequency use, but all the cell carriers now impose limits on data bandwidth, so this type of solution would really only be economically attractive when using WiFi networks, a severe limitation indeed.

It’s more likely that the author is taking a devil’s advocate point-of-view to make people think through their adoption of new technology, a process we employ as part of our technology strategy consulting services. If that is really the case here, then this author is to be commended.

Please feel free to contact us if you are thinking of using QR codes.

Mobile Computing: Native Apps versus Web Apps

What it Means to Your Organization

by Harry Tarnoff

Our clients often ask about the advantages of mobile applications and the differences between mobile “native apps” and “web apps.” They ask, “How would a mobile app relate to our business, our people, and the products and services we offer? Should our mobile app be a native app or a web app? Should we consider corresponding changes in our business’ IT systems?”

A well-designed mobile app can certainly complement a business’ website and aid in the marketing and sales of the business’s offerings. The selection of a native or web platform will affect an app’s characteristics, what services it can readily provide, and the app’s future evolution. A wrong choice could cripple a start-up or a company launching a new offering. A poorly designed app may never become popular enough to gather a following.

Even more striking is how mobile apps are growing in importance. The percentage of mobile-only users, at 25% today, is estimated to be more than 65% in 2015. This means that, instead of your website, it could soon be your mobile app that tells your customers about you, your company and its offerings. Your mobile apps need the same care, professionalism, and polish as your website and marketing brochures. The quality of your brand must be high for all elements of your public persona.

Fundamental Differences

A “native app” works on only certain devices for which it is targeted. It is written in one of the development languages supported by the target device. A native app runs on the target device and typically stores its data on the device. Native apps can run very fast and can easily interface with any of the device’s hardware and operating system features.

The flexibility of a native app comes at a price, however: Native apps written for one platform, say Apple’s iOS which drives iPhones and iPads, are not compatible with other platforms like Android or BlackBerry OS. Developers spend significant resources to translate, or “port,” their applications to run on each additional device family. Supporting and maintaining similar software for multiple platforms is expensive.

On the other hand, a “web app” is developed using standard web technologies like HTML, CSS and JavaScript. The resulting program, typically accessed through a URL web address, requires only a device with a standards-based browser. An iPhone, iPad, Blackberry, Android phone, or Android tablet can all be suitable clients for the same application.

A web app pulls content from a remote server, so it needs an active WiFi or cellular link. A web app running within a mobile browser generally runs slower than a similar native app, has some restrictions on its user interface, and often cannot take full advantage of special device features.

But the extent of these differences is narrowing. Native and web apps are breaking through their stereotypes. New development platforms let native apps share a common codebase, easing development. Improvements in mobile browsers and new mobile OS features, let web apps mimic their native counterparts and access special device hardware features. Cross-compiling development platforms improve the performance of web technologies.

Better Business Software

Can Business Software be Better?

We have all heard the horror stories regarding business software systems: The tremendously expensive system. The system that didn’t work. The system that couldn’t grow with the business. The provider who wanted $50,000 a module and five modules would be needed. Critical software changes that take weeks or months.

With fast-changing markets, demographics and new regulations, businesses need to be nimble and fast in their reactions. The last thing a business needs is to hampered by expensive and time-consuming system implementations. Hearing about the bad experiences of others’ raises the question, what are the characteristics of good business software?

Thinking from a business owner’s perspective, better business software should:

  • Work reliably and securely
  • Be adjusted to take into account the uniqueness of the business’ operation
  • Come at a cost that doesn’t break the bank
  • Come with easy access to the software’s actual developers for the best possible technical support
  • Be quickly extendible when new features are desired
  • Not be locked in to a specific platform that doesn’t have a bright future or comes with high monthly expenses
  • Maximize connectivity from anywhere using mobile devices

A tall order, right? Not so with us. With DataPlex and AmpUp – our rapid software development tool for business enterprise applications – you get business software that offers modern capabilities that can easily be altered to meet changing needs, possibly giving your business a competitive advantage.

By leveraging AmpUp, you get:

  • A reliable and secure system that take into account the uniqueness of your business’ operation. We start by doing a free assessment of your current operation and then work with you to develop effective new displays and processes.
  • A system at a fraction of the cost of other commercial systems, including those that claim to be “off the shelf.”
  • Easy access and great support. We are the developers, and you have our direct phone numbers. (Email too.)
  • The ability to add new features quickly and at any time. We’re happy to be your technical advisors on anything daunting.
  • A web-based system that can be easily ported to your favorite cost-effective hosting service including those “in the cloud.”
  • Connectivity from Internet-enabled mobile devices whether they be Android-based, Apple, Blackberry, Microsoft or something else.

We introduced AmpUp six months ago because, frankly, we were shocked at what some of our clients were telling us about what they had to put up for systems and support. We didn’t think that a small business needed to spend six figures for a new system, wait six months for their so-called customizations, and then wait weeks for bug fixes which sometimes added even more bugs.

AmpUp logoAmpUp, it turns out, is a software development game-changer. It is a stable “software as a service” or SaaS platform that is shared among many different applications. In four months, we have been able to implement four very sophisticated enterprise systems. That’s one per month. Yes, you read that correctly – you could have one of our completely customized enterprise-wide systems working for you in a surprisingly short amount of time.

Interested? Feel free to drop us a call or note. We look forward to chatting with you soon.

DataPlex Readies Release of Law Enforcement Enterprise Application

DataPlex, Inc., along with its partner firm The Juran Company, is putting the finishing touches on an electronic field reporting system (EFRS) for use by police officers. This enterprise system is highly tailored for busy police departments and other law enforcement agencies that would like to make their officers, agents and staff more efficient in completing incident reports. By using DataPlex’s new AmpUp rapid development tool, DataPlex EFRS conveniently ties together the front office, the back office and mobile platforms by allowing the use of wireless tablets and integrating with emergency 911 and emergency alert systems.

Introducing AmpUp, a Cloud-Based Enterprise Platform

AmpUp logo

We have developed a web-centric database tool called “AmpUp” used for rapid development of enterprise systems. Born out of necessity for supporting our customers, AmpUp has successfully demonstrated that it reduces implementation efforts and budgets by more than 50%.

Conceptually, the AmpUp tool is a wrapper between an organization’s data and its website. By providing a number of  high-level enterprise system functions for database access, user security and web page generation, developers are now able to concentrate the bulk of their time on their customers’ unique requirements.

AmpUp follows the cloud paradigm of Platform as a Service (PaaS). This is where AmpUp’s functions are available to a public or private cloud and can be shared across several systems. For customers with more sensitive applications, AmpUp is available for installation on their private Intranet as well.

While there is more technical information about AmpUp on the DataPlex website, in this article we would like to focus on these four features:

  • Automatically taps into existing databases
  • Provides instantaneous web forms and reports
  • Enables static and dynamic field dropdown selection
  • Easily adds data record navigation controls

At the Crossroads of Enterprise, Mobile and the Cloud

DataPlex helps you intersect enterprise, mobile and the cloud

Navigate the Intersection of Enterprise, Mobile and the Cloud

As a disruptive phenomenon in the realm of information technology, Cloud Computing is evolving quickly and driving changes both in the personal space and in the corporate world towards a more portable and web-centric infrastructure, particularly in such areas as sales, marketing, customer relations, logistics and fulfillment.

Back in  October 2008, we said “In only a matter of a couple short years, mobile computing with third party applications will become de rigueur, so it would be wise to plan for that eventuality.” It seems we’re on track.

More important than the introduction of the next generation electronic devices such as the latest iPhone and iPad is the prodigious convergence of enterprise IT with mobile computing with cloud-based services. If you missed it, our previous newsletter article “Exploring Cloud Computing” discusses the current state of personal and corporate services being provided over the Internet. It makes cases for when organizations with existing IT structures should explore moving some of their internal and commercial processes over to the cloud.

While one might understand that the cloud is basically a set of remote software services that can be leveraged to reduce the size and cost of in-house IT support, what he or she should also understand is how the growing shift to the cloud is affecting the types of devices and applications we all use.