Tag Archives: dynamic IP

Free Internet Node, Part 1 – Equipment and Location Evaluation

Okay, let’s get started. Remember, I am going to describe my actual approach and make more general comments to cover slightly different hardware and approaches. Please feel free to chime in by adding comments. (By the way, we have a few what-should-be-obvious rules for posting comments.)

The first step I took in setting up my own Internet node was to evaluate my potential equipment and locations. Depending on the amount of traffic I might expect, I would require different bandwidths and therefore would need to set up my equipment and choose my location accordingly.

Given my estimated low load of, say, under a hundred or so hits per hour, I decided to locate the node at my residence on its existing DSL line, noting that I could always scale upwards in case my traffic takes off or I add what become a popular website. I determined that I could get by with my existing 512 kilobits per second DSL modem and one of my old PCs as the Internet node. (DSL lines can actually go up to 1.5 megabits per second depending on your DSL service. You can test the speed of your current DSL connection.)

For reasons having to doing with noise and power consumption, I switched over later to a new eMachines mini-tower PC which cost me around $250 at Best Buy after all the rebates came back. Here’s another eMachines pricing sample along with some specifications directly from eMachines themselves.

Anyway, just make sure whatever PC you use is less than a couple of years old and, preferably, running XP Home or Pro. You can upgrade not too old PCs without any big hassles. Not to promote Windows XP too much, however you can optimize your security access, benefit from XP’s advanced features, and add hardware with minimal effort. (You can use older PCs running older versions of Windows such as Win98, but the end results will be sub par and your security will only be slightly better than nil.) The PC should have at least 20 gigabytes of available space, use an Intel-based processor running at least 2 GHz, and be very quiet if it is going to be within earshot. The latest version of an eMachines PC that I bought easily met this criteria.

What about Windows Vista? It may work well actually, but we did all of our work on Windows XP, and we haven’t found a compelling reason to upgrade. From what we hear, Windows Vista is a different animal when if comes to PC operating systems and there are incompatibilities with some software packages. All it would take is one small module not working to put a serious damper on things. Anyway, the incompatibilities with using Windows Vista may diminish greatly after Microsoft’s final release of Service Pack 1 (SP1) which is scheduled for early 2008 (a release candidate is available now). Anyway, I may post a Windows Vista report later since that is the operating system most easily accessible today. For now, downgrade to XP or just buy a used PC with Windows XP on eBay.

So, with my existing equipment of an older tower PC and a DSL line and modem all of which could already access the Internet, I encountered my first dilemma. The typical $30 DSL line to a residence (such as through SBC) requires a log in. Until your equipment logs in, you do not have an IP address. And should you have to log off (or be forced off) for any reason and then sign back in, you will have a different IP address.

Web servers, email servers and ftp servers are best located on a static IP address, a permanent address on the Internet that never changes. With the low cost residential DSL line with a dynamically allocated IP address, you would have to change some network parameters each time your IP address changes. (I am being vague about the “parameters” as that would be a digression, and I do not want to lose focus right now.) While that is possible, it is a technical pain, and, depending on the reliability of your DSL provider and your telephone lines, you might have to change the parameters several times a month. Also, your node will be down until your equipment logs back in and changes its parameters, maybe a good part of a day.

Fortunately, I found that I could upgrade to a static IP address for an extra $25 a month. I feel that paying such a small fee to not have to deal with changing IP addresses. If you disagree, you can explore the dynamic IP address route with either DSL or cable modems and let me know how it works out for you.

The change from a dynamically allocated to a statically allocated IP address took less than 48 hours. Since I use a LinkSys router, I did have to switch it over from PPPoE to Static IP Addressing. Note: This step is different for different routers but is typically achieved using your browser to access your router’s parameters at your local URL address http://192.168.1.1.

Thusly, I was able to evaluate my existing equipment and location and found both acceptable with the one change to switch over to a permanent IP address. I estimate this effort took about four hours of my time, most of which was dealing with the phone company and the router.

Next Up: Free Internet Node, Part 2 – Setting up the Internet Node PC