Tag Archives: smartphones

Death To The QR Code?

Recently, a business journalist posted an article suggesting that the use of QR codes should be dropped. He says in part “Mobile barcodes can be confusing and can waste time. And as mobile technology progresses, they probably aren’t even necessary.”

We disagree.

DataPlex QR CodeThis is one of those “insights” where the author doesn’t make his case. On one hand he presumes that technology will remain static and that the barriers to QR Code scanning — locating the right scanning app, waiting for the camera to focus, etc. — won’t improve and therefore users will be turned off. On the other hand, “near field communications” may arise in the next generation of smartphones to render QR code scanning obsolete. Which is it, is technology static or evolving?

We think that QR codes are a perfect ‘tweener technology that has virtually no extra printing cost and works with all smartphones. Yes, you have to be sure to use a compatible application, but once you figure that out for QR Codes (and again for Microsoft Tag codes), you’re set. Launching the app, waiting for the camera to focus and having the app autodetect the QR code and link to the corresponding URL takes no more than a few seconds. That is much faster than typing in a URL or keywords, if you don’t make mistakes or get distracted before you finish.

Also, when coupled with the right type of business software such as that based on our web-based, Rapid Enterprise Deployment engine known as AmpUp, the added cost of putting together a QR-code marketing campaign is negligible, so therefore the resulting ROI can be huge. Such systems can produce all of the differing QR codes, maintain a database, and then provide URL landing pages with corresponding and compelling content. Through web dashboards, company execs continuously monitor a campaign’s performance and even tweak it midstream if necessary.

The author suggests also that image recognition is a reasonable alternative. Not so. Mobile devices do not have the processing horsepower to implement broad-range image recognition, so they would have to upload the captured image to a capable server and receive the results. This might work for low-frequency use, but all the cell carriers now impose limits on data bandwidth, so this type of solution would really only be economically attractive when using WiFi networks, a severe limitation indeed.

It’s more likely that the author is taking a devil’s advocate point-of-view to make people think through their adoption of new technology, a process we employ as part of our technology strategy consulting services. If that is really the case here, then this author is to be commended.

Please feel free to contact us if you are thinking of using QR codes.

Personal Computing Comes Full Circle

Revisiting the Lessons of Timesharing

by Warren Juran

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”  George Santayana, might have been talking about how today’s Internet-based computing echoes computer timesharing from the 1960s and 1970s.  How can the lessons learned from that early era of computing help us to design better systems and applications today?  The tale of personal computing’s evolutionary path shows what experienced engineers and developers can bring to the design table.

Once upon a time, computers were so large and expensive that hardly anyone could afford to have one.  Computer users punched their program instructions and data into cards and brought the decks of cards to a computer center.  Operators at the computer center fed the cards into the computer’s input device.  The printed results were available after a considerable wait.  This inconvenient system seemed to take forever to debug software because of the delays after each cycle of correction and re-submission.  There wasn’t much ready-to-use software and the benefits of computing were available to very few.

Computer timesharing let more people enjoy the advantages of “personal computing.”  Hundreds of users could use their own keyboard/printer terminals to share the resources of one central computer.  In the 1960s and 1970s, computer timesharing companies spread around the world, operating large data centers and communications networks to provide dial-up services for their users.  Timesharing companies opened branch offices in large cities and employed armies of salesmen to locate and cultivate new customers.  The new customers could do their own interactive programming, or use extensive libraries of ready-to-use software for their computing needs.

The timesharing companies provided the central computers, communications networks, software libraries, customer support and education, printing services, remote job entry for traditional “batch” computing jobs, client data storage, and a one-stop-shop for word processing, accounting, messaging, engineering analysis and other customer requirements.

Developers of early timesharing systems dealt with issues like utilizing limited bandwidth, providing rapid access to large amounts of data, and insuring that individual users didn’t monopolize computer resources. Tools like “linked lists,” “sparse matrices,” “hashing,” and priority queuing helped improve timesharing systems. Today’s computers and communication networks are vastly more powerful than their early counterparts, but disciplines like Information Theory, Queuing Theory, Distributed Computing and Peer-to-Peer computing can still enhance system performance and reduce costs.

At the Crossroads of Enterprise, Mobile and the Cloud

DataPlex helps you intersect enterprise, mobile and the cloud

Navigate the Intersection of Enterprise, Mobile and the Cloud

As a disruptive phenomenon in the realm of information technology, Cloud Computing is evolving quickly and driving changes both in the personal space and in the corporate world towards a more portable and web-centric infrastructure, particularly in such areas as sales, marketing, customer relations, logistics and fulfillment.

Back in  October 2008, we said “In only a matter of a couple short years, mobile computing with third party applications will become de rigueur, so it would be wise to plan for that eventuality.” It seems we’re on track.

More important than the introduction of the next generation electronic devices such as the latest iPhone and iPad is the prodigious convergence of enterprise IT with mobile computing with cloud-based services. If you missed it, our previous newsletter article “Exploring Cloud Computing” discusses the current state of personal and corporate services being provided over the Internet. It makes cases for when organizations with existing IT structures should explore moving some of their internal and commercial processes over to the cloud.

While one might understand that the cloud is basically a set of remote software services that can be leveraged to reduce the size and cost of in-house IT support, what he or she should also understand is how the growing shift to the cloud is affecting the types of devices and applications we all use.

The Expansiveness of Mobile Computing

Volume 3, Number 5

What Mobile Computing means to Consumers and the Enterprise

The arrival of the next generation of smartphones such as Apple’s iPhone  and the G1 based on Google’s Android technology heralds a new era in mobile computing. But what does this mean to consumers, and how do enterprises leverage these new devices without sacrificing security?

These are good questions, but let me start out by saying what this article is not. This article is not a review or endorsement of either the iPhone or the G1 phone or any other smartphone as there are simply too many features that matter disproportionately to different types of users.  Besides, there are already plenty of reviews on the specific devices.

Instead, this article abstracts the notion of mobile computing and suggests ways it can and will enhance our lives, whether we are consumers checking our email and stock market investments or as members of a business, collaborating with our peers while away from the office.